May 2011 Archives

May 31, 2011

Is Hospital Malpractice Rampant in Syracuse, NY? Just Ask Medicare.

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for surgery.jpgThe Syracuse Post Standard ran an Article this weekend titled, "The stats the hospital industry doesn't want you to know". The article talked about a recent Medicare study revealing that patients in Syracuse area hospitals often get worse, instead of better, because they become victims of preventable "hospital-acquired conditions" ("HAC"), which consist of such things as patient falls, infections, foreign objects being left in patients after surgery, bedsores, poor blood sugar control for diabetes, and wrong blood transfusions. The statistics are alarming: In an 18-month period between 2008 and 2010, our local hospitals had 175 cases of Medicare patients developing "hospital-acquired conditions".

All this may surprise some, but it does not come as a surprise to Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers like those at Michaels & Smolak. We have successfully sued several local hospitals for these types of failures.

Here are some examples of our local hospitals' failures during the Medicare-reported time period: Upstate Hospital had 5 times the national average of blood infections from catheters; St. Joseph's had the 5 times the national rate of urinary tract infections; and there were five cases of foreign objects being left in patients after surgery -- two at Crouse Hospital, two at Upstate and one at St. Joe's.

All this is pretty damn unacceptable. But not as unacceptable as the hospital industry objecting to Medicare's publishing this data on its website. Medicare published the stats despite the objections.

Why did they object? Are they afraid patients will vote with their feet? The only way Syracuse hospitals will improve is if their feet are put to the fire of open disclosure (thank you Medicare investigators) and good reporting (thank you Syracuse Post Standard). As I have said before, shame is a powerful motivator of improvement.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 28, 2011

Driver Distraction Caused Minetto NY Car-On-Mororcycle Crash

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for motorcycle riders.jpgI was right. In my last blog post I discussed the Minetto car-on-motorcycle collision. The car had drifted over into the motorcycle's lane of travel and collided with it. In my blog post, I said "my guess as to why this young driver crossed over? Driver distraction". I explained that, as a New York car and motorcycle accident lawyer, I have been representing more and more victims of distracted driver-related accidents, mostly caused by drivers texting or dialing while driving.

Well, on Friday the Syracuse Post Standard reported that the driver of the car had just received a text message and was looking for a pen to write with when she crossed over into the oncoming lane and crashed with the motorcyclist.

Moral of the story? Keep your eyes on the road, and off your cell phone, or other electronic device.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 21, 2011

Car-On-Motorcycle Collision In Minetto, New York -- Whose Fault?

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for motorcycle riders.jpgWhen Central New York motorcycle accident lawyers like me read about a motorcycle-on-car collision, by force of habit, we focus on fault. You can't always tell when you read the newspaper whose fault it was. But often you can. Here's a recent example.

I just read on Syracuse.com about a Minetto, New York car-on-motorcycle collision. A young motorist (18 years old) crossed over into the oncoming lane and struck a 55-year old motorcyclist on State Route 48. The motorcyclist was airlifted to Upstate Hospital in Syracuse. After hitting the biker head-on, the car crashed through a guard rail and landed in the Oswego River. The driver and his passenger were able to swim to safety.

Of course the investigation will focus on what caused this driver to veer over into the oncoming lane. Unless the driver has some very good excuse (and it is hard to imagine one, short of a swarm of bees suddenly attacking her, or the steering wheel suddenly failing), she, and the owner of the car, will be held liable for the motorcyclist's medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering.

On the other hand, because the driver is so young, she probably has no assets, and probably was driving with the minimal amount of liability insurance ($25,000). So the motorcyclist may have trouble getting all the compensation he will need. A good motorcycle accident lawyer will look under every rock, and in every nook and cranny, to unearth any and all insurance policies or assets available.

My guess as to why this young driver crossed over? Driver distraction. I have been blogging about this a lot recently. Cell phones, texting, and other electronic gadgetry. Those causes a lot of the crossovers these days.

It is also possible that the driver crossed over deliberately for some reason, and just failed to see the motorcycle before doing so. That's one of the big problems with motorcycles --- other motorists tend not to see them. But they are required to see them, and are at fault if they don't.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 20, 2011

Who Is Usually At Fault In Car-On-Bicycle Collisions?

Thumbnail image for bicyclists racing.jpgToday was "bike to work day", and as an avid bicyclist and a Central New York bicycle accident lawyer, I couldn't resist snooping around a bit on the web to see what I could find. I stumbled upon an interesting article about bike-on-car crashes on NPR's website entitled, "When Bikes And Cars Collide, Who's More Likely To Be At Fault?"

The article recites the fact that bicycle-on-motor-vehicle collisions in the U.S.A. take about 600 cyclists' lives a year and injure about 51,000. The article then discusses several studies that have attempted to determine whether cyclists or car operators are more often at fault. Answer? It depends. Different studies have reached opposite results. Overall, though, it appears that cars are slightly more likely to be at fault. This surprised me. In my experience representing injured cyclists in Central New York, the motorist is far more often at fault.

The most interesting part of the article, though, was a discussion regarding the most common types of car-on-bike crashes. The winner? Bicyclists getting rear-ended by cars. This validates my fear, which I blogged about before, of cars approaching from behind me on narrow, shoulder-less roads.

Best of all, the article links to another site that maps out pictorially the 5 most common types of car-on-bicycle collisions and how to avoid them. Each type of car-on-bike collision is given a name: "The left cross, the right hook, dooring, parking-lotted, and overtaking". This site is a must-read for all cyclists because, once you see the illustrations of how most bike-on-car collisions happen, you can better avoid them.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 17, 2011

Central and Syracuse NY Car Accident Lawyer Says, "If You Are A Hit-And-Run Victim, Seek Insurance Coverage Through Your Own Auto Policy"

police car.jpg Hit-and-run car accidents happen more often that you think. As a Central and Syracuse New York car accident lawyer, I know. I have handled dozens of cases like that. And there was just a hit-and-run in Auburn, New York this week. News media report that an Auburn, NY resident was seriously injured Saturday at 1:45 a.m. when a hit-and-run car crashed into him while he was riding on his scooter on Division Street. The scoundrel drove off and left the poor scooter-driver high-and-dry -- and seriously injured. The police are asking anyone with information about this tragic, and despicable, act to contact them. So please do!

This same thing could happen to you, whether you are a pedestrian or in your car. Let's say the cops never find the bum who hit you. Where can you turn for help getting your medical bills paid, and your lost wages reimbursed? And against whom can you bring claim pain and suffering compensation?

The answer? "Your own automobile insurer". That's right, your own car insurance has a provision in it called "uninsured motorist coverage". That means that if an uninsured or a hit-and-run motorist strikes you as a pedestrian, or while you are in your car, you (and your passengers) can claim wage loss replacement and medical benefits ("no-fault") as well as liability benefits (generally "pain and suffering compensation") through your own "uninsured motorist coverage".

The trick is you have to notify your insurance carrier early on that you are making the claim. Otherwise the insurer might disclaim based on "late notice".

So if you are the victim of a hit-and-run - whether while driving your car or as a pedestrian, call your own auto insurer. Make an uninsured motorist claim. But also contact an experienced New York auto accident lawyer to help you. He or she can guide you through the process. If your insurance carrier refuses to give you a fair settlement for your pain and suffering compensation --- and that's not unusual - you will need your lawyer to fight for you.

By the way, even if you don't own a car or truck, and you are struck as a pedestrian by a hit-and-run driver, you can seek the same kind of insurance coverage through a New York State-regulated agency called the Motor Vehicle Accident Indemnification Corporation (MVAIC). And you will definitely need a lawyer to guide you through that process.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 16, 2011

New York Motorcycle Lawyer Must Exercise Special Care In Picking a Jury

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for motorcycle riders.jpgIt was a typical car-on-motorcycle collision, like so many the Central and Syracuse New York motorcycle lawyers of Michaels & Smolak have handled over the years. The car operator had a stop sign, and the biker did not. But, as often happens, the car driver did not notice the motorcyclist, and left the stop sign, violating the biker's right of way. Crash!

I am preparing for my Central New York motorcycle injury trial soon. And in motorcycle injury cases, picking a fair jury is both difficult and crucial. Why? Because many jurors want to blame the motorcycle rider for his injuries merely because he was riding a motorcycle.

The remedy for this bias? Aggressive "voir dire". What's that? That's where the lawyers get to ask prospective jurors questions to find out if they can be fair. I will ask lots of questions designed to ferret out hidden biases against motorcycles and bikers. At the same time, I will be educating the prospective jurors that New York motor vehicle accident law does not allow them to blame the biker for being on a motorcycle. They must blame only the driver who violated the rules of the road, and in this case, that was the car driver.

Some jurors might think, "gee, motorcycles are hard to see because they are so much smaller than cars. Maybe it was not the car driver's fault for failing to see the motorcyclist". I will have to explain to the jurors that this is not a proper consideration. Under New York law, a driver of any vehicle has a duty to see what's there to be seen, whether it's a Mack truck, a Harley, a mo-ped, a bicycle or a pedestrian. It's no excuse that a motorcycle is harder to see.

And there's still more biased thinking a juror can bring into the jury room! For example, some jurors tend to think, "O.K., so it was the car driver's fault, but heck, that motorcyclist would not have been so badly injured if he had been in a car". That kind of reasoning is not allowed, either! True, motorcyclists' injuries are often more serious than car operators' injuries. But a motorcycle rider is within his rights to be riding on the public highway. A car driver who violates his right-of-way is liable to him to the full extent of his injuries, no matter that he might have suffered less serious injuries if he had been in a car.

Picking a fair jury in a New York motorcycle injury case is tough --- but I'm ready!

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 15, 2011

Syracuse New York Construction Accident Lawyer Looks Up And Sees Labor Laws Being Broken!

roofers.jpgTake a drive around Central New York in this nice springtime weather and you'll probably see workers up on ladders and roofs, repairing roofs, gutters or doing other types of construction work. But you probably don't look at construction work the same way I do. As a Syracuse New York construction accident lawyer, I see laws being broken! The workers are not breaking the law, but the contractors who hire them and the owners of the buildings they are working on are.

Under New York's Labor Law and Federal law (OSHA), construction workers working from heights are required to be tied up with a full-body harness attached to a shock-absorbing lanyard or a retractable lifeline. A lanyard or lifeline stops the worker from hitting the ground - instead his fall is arrested on the way down. And because lanyards and lifelines are made to absorb shock, the gravitational forces on the body are minimized. The full-body harness then distributes the remaining gravitational forces of the fall throughout the entire body so as minimize the risk of strain or injury to any part of the body.

The contractor and owner of the building are also supposed to ensure that the ladders workers use to get up to the heights they are working from are tied down, both at the bottom and the top.

Despite these laws, over and over again I see painters, roofers and other workers on rooftops and ladders with no fall protection at all. They are working from untied ladders, and strolling around on rooftops free as birds - but without the benefit of wings!

Here's just one blatant example: Last summer as I walked from my office to the Auburn Y for a workout, I observed about a dozen workers way up on the Y's 5-story tall roof, walking around without any lanyards or harnesses, and no fall protection at all. At that time, I happened to be Chair of the Auburn Y Board, so I immediately told our Executive Director, who then called the roofing contractor to complain that the workers were not abiding by New York Labor Law. The next day all the workers were safely tied up.

Why did I bother reporting this? If those guys want to risk their lives it's their own business, right? Wrong.

First, I care about them. As a Central and Syracuse New York work accident lawyer, I have represented too many fallen workers, and too many of their widows, in New York construction accident cases. I have seen devastating fall-related injuries, and death, close up.

Second, under New York Labor Law 240, the general contractor and owner of the building (and sometimes others, too) are all liable to a worker (or his surviving family) who is injured or killed because he was not provided with fall protection devices (tied-down ladders, lanyards, lifelines, harnesses, etc.). So by insisting that these workers use proper fall prevention devices, I was actually doing my duty as Board Chair in protecting the Y's assets.

Construction workers, Keep safe! Tie yourselves, and your ladders, up! But if you don't because you are not instructed to do so, or because no fall prevention devices were made available to you, and you fall and are injured, call me --- you will almost certainly have a very strong New York falling worker case against, at the very least, the general contractor and owner of the building.

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 8, 2011

Seneca Falls Medical Malpractice Lawyer's Trial Hits The Press

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for surgery.jpg Here at Michaels & Smolak, we are pretty down to earth and modest. We don't go around calling the press about our Central and Syracuse New York personal injury or medical malpractice settlements or verdicts, although we feel they are pretty impressive. You can see some of them here.

Most of our clients prefer to keep a low profile, and so do we. All they want is justice, not fame . Same with us.

But the press has a mind of its own. For instance, one of my partners, Lee Michaels, started a Seneca Falls medical malpractice trial this past Monday. Lee sued, on behalf of the window of a medical malpractice victim, two Rochester Neurosurgeons. On Tuesday, a front-page article appeared in the Geneva Finger Lakes Times about the trial. No one at our office called the press or let them know Lee was starting a serious medical malpractice trial in Seneca Falls. None of us thought this was newsworthy. It is just one of many Central New York medical malpractice cases that go to trial every year.

I assume the Geneva Finger Lakes Times will also report on the jury's verdict, which should be delivered in about a week. Whatever the result, you can be sure we did not report it to the press. But a trial is open to the public, and the press has a right to report on whatever they deem "newsworthy".

Michaels & Smolak respects freedom of speech and press. We only hope that the reporting will be fair to both sides, just like the verdict.

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 7, 2011

Central and Syracuse NY Car & Bicycle Accident Lawyer Breaks The Law (SSSHHHH!)

bicyclists racing.jpgI have a confession to make. I'm a law breaker. Wait, wait! Before you turn me in, let me explain!

You see, New York bicycle law requires cyclists to follow the same rules of the road as cars and other vehicles. That means riding on the right side of the road. But some of those country roads out here around Geneva, NY, where I live, and Auburn, NY, where I work, have no paved shoulders. That means you have to ride on that white line (called the "fog line") that delineates the edge of the highway. And that in turn means that cars passing me from behind at 55 miles per hour come too close for comfort. If they see me, they usually mosey on over to the left a bit. But what if they don't see me because their eyes are glued to their cell phone? And what if they veer off just a little to the right . . .?

Well, excuse me for not wanting to end my life as a hood ornament.

Yes, I am paranoid. Not my fault: I am, among other things, a New York car and bicycle accident lawyer. My job representing victims of Central New York and Syracuse bicycle and auto accidents teaches me that, with all the electronic devices available these days, drivers are just not looking where they are going anymore! I have three police reports on my desk right now - one where the driver was texting and slammed into a car stopped and waiting to turn left into a driveway on Border City Road in Waterloo, NY. The offending driver was texting. The second involves a driver who was texting, veered into the oncoming lane, and hit the oncoming car head on in Geneva, NY. The third involves a pedestrian walking down Routes 5/20 in Junius, NY when a driver, who was texting, veered off to the shoulder and took her out.

With all that pain, suffering, injury and yes, death, weighing down my desk -- and my mind -- every day, can you blame me for wondering -- as cars whiz past me from behind -- whether I prefer cremation or burial?

New York bicycle law was written before the era of distracted driving. That law still makes sense, but not always. And there is a higher law - the law of survival. So I sometimes scoot on over to the other side of the road, in violation of the law! That way I can see the cars coming at me, which may give me time to avoid a collision -- or at least to say a Hail Mary before I leave this world (hey - I was brought up Catholic and will probably end up, in that last nanosecond, where I started).

Please don't tell anyone - it'll be just our little secret.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 4, 2011

How To Handle Your Traffic Ticket If You Are Injured And Claim Another Driver Was At Fault (Part II)

traffic ticket.jpgAfter I posted my last blog, entitled, How Should I Handle My NY Traffic Violation Ticket When I Was Injured In a Car Accident, fellow New York personal injury lawyer Christina Sonsire, of the Ziff Law Firm in Elmira, New York, emailed me. She formerly worked as an assistant district attorney, so she knows criminal law, whereas I, admittedly, do not. Christina, a fine New York personal injury and medical malpractice attorney, brought to my attention that my advice might have been a bit misguided. She informed me that, at least in some counties in New York, not showing up for a traffic violation trial might not result in a conviction, but rather the judge will "scoff" you, which could be worse than a mere conviction. To quote, Christina:

"Instead, the court will scoff her license when she does not show. The scoff will result in a suspension of her driver's license, setting her up for a misdemeanor if she drives and is caught".

In the case I blogged about, the accused doesn't drive, so she need not worry about this. But as a general matter, I don't think it is a good idea to "scoff" a judge! Therefore, my advice to an injured victim of a car accident who is contemplating a claim against a negligent driver, but who was also ticketed for a traffic violation related to the car accident, would probably be to show up for traffic court trial and "take the fifth" (refuse to testify)! That way you don't "scoff" the judge by failing to appear, you don't plead guilty to a violation (which could hurt your personal injury case) and you don't give testimony which could come back to haunt you in your personal injury case. Instead, you are merely convicted of a traffic violation. And that won't be admissible as evidence in your personal injury case. Although paying the fine, and taking the points on your license, might hurt, it might be worth the price of preserving your personal injury case intact, especially if you are very hurt.

Thanks for setting me straight Christina!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 2, 2011

How Should I Handle my NY Traffic Violation Ticket When I Was Injured In a Car Accident?

Thumbnail image for crosswalk.jpg A New York motor vehicle accident case I recently handled illustrates how traffic court and New York motor vehicle injury law intersect. Here's the scenario: A car strikes a pedestrian in a crosswalk. Pedestrian is hurt. The cop, however, faults the pedestrian, and tickets her for leaving the curb without looking when the car was already too close. Normally the pedestrian has the right of way in a crosswalk, but not when she leaves the curb when the car to close to avoid her (New York Vehicle & Traffic Law 1151[2]).

It is surprising that the cop tickets the pedestrian because she was actually quite a ways out into the crosswalk when she was struck, and the car driver admitted she had been distracted looking to the side of the road at another pedestrian just before she struck the pedestrian in the crosswalk.

The pedestrian has a court date on the crosswalk violation. If convicted of the violation, she will get a fine of, at most, $270. If you were the injured pedestrian's New York personal injury lawyer, what would you advise her to do? Three options: (1) go to traffic court and tell her story so that she doesn't get convicted of the traffic violation; or (2) bargain with the D.A. to plead guilty to some lesser charge to reduce the fine; or (3) just don't show up to court and let them convict her.

I'll tell you what I would advise the pedestrian: Number 3. Why? The problem with number 1 is that whatever she says in Court can later be used against her in the personal injury trial. She might say something inadvertently on the stand that somehow hurts her personal injury case. But won't her traffic violation conviction be used against her in the personal injury trial? No. A conviction to a traffic violation is not admissible in a subsequent personal injury trial - the jury will never hear about it.

What about number 2? No way! Any plea of guilty to anything can be used against her in the personal injury case as an "admission" of fault.

Since the maximum fine is only $270, she should just take the hit, avoid testifying, and avoid pleading guilty to anything. Her New York personal injury case against the driver will come out unscathed --- nothing has harmed it. And that's worth the $270 fine!

(Important: Read Part II of this blog here!)

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293

May 1, 2011

Motorcyclists In Syracuse And Central New York Can Pray And Use Common Sense To Avoid Accidents

Now that spring is finally here, motorcycles are, too. This Syracuse and Central New York motorcycle accident lawyer knows --- I've already gotten a few calls about motorcycle accidents.
Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for motorcycle riders.jpgIf you ride a bike, maybe God can keep you safe. It seems that many bikers think so. On April 27, the American Bikers Aimed Toward Education (ABATE) revved up the season with the traditional "Blessing of the Bikes" at St. Daniel's Church in Lyncourt. With over 1,500 central New York motorcyclists in attendance, Monsigner Eugene Yennock took about an hour to bless each bike.

ABATE does good work - they promote bike safety in Syracuse and Central New York and beyond, and they sponsor the Blessing-of-the-Bikes ceremony, too. But you don't need divine intervention to avoid motorcycle accidents.

Don't get me wrong - invoking protection from above can't hurt - but common-sense riding can avoid many accidents. Most central New York motorcycle-on-car collisions happen when the car (or truck) driver fails to yield the right-of-way to the biker, or just fails to see him. So stay visible, and I would recommend audible, too. Ride a loud bike if you can, keep your light on, and, hey, why not, wear bright clothing.

Aggressive driving is always just plain dumb - no matter what you are driving - but when your vehicle is a motorcycle, well, that's beyond dumb - it's suicidal. Hey, do you have a death wish? If you do, just keep driving that machine like a macho-man.

The other day I read that, in my home town of Geneva, New York, the police gave chase to a motorcyclist going 100 miles per hour on a City street --- Genesee Street - which is a 30-mile-per-hour street. The chase was so dangerous the cops gave it up, and the bone-headed biker got away. But how much longer will his luck last? Eventually he will end up as a hood ornament on an on-coming car, or like one of those witches you see at Halloween time crashed into a tree.

Hey, if that happens to you, while you are going 100 miles per hour in a 30 mile-per-hour zone, don't bother calling me. But if you are the victim of the negligent driving of someone else, or of bad road design or maintenance, give this Syracuse motorcycle lawyer a shout and we'll try to help you get your life back together.

Keep safe!

Mike Bersani

Email me at: bersani@michaels-smolak.com I'd love to hear from you!

Michael G. Bersani, Esq.
michaels-smolak.com
Central NY Personal Injury Lawyer
Michaels & Smolak, P.C.

1-315-253-3293